Welcome back to our litigation series on California cannabis claims. Today, we’ll be discussing intentional interference or “tortious interference” – which may apply to your situation if you find that a third party is improperly interfering with you and your contractual relationships.

Introduction

This claim stems from California’s basic recognition that contractual relationships are worthy of protection from the acts of third parties. Therefore, any third party that intentionally seeks out to disrupt or otherwise interfere with an existing contractual relationship can be liable for the damage that results from interference.

Statute of Limitations

The statute of limitations on an intentional interference with contractual relations is two years. That clock starts ticking on the date of the third party’s wrongful act or, if unknown, no later than the date the contract is breached as a result of the tortious interference.

Elements of an Intentional Interference with Contractual Relations Claim

The elements of a cause of action for intentional interference with contractual relations are:

A valid contract: a valid agreement must exist between the plaintiff and a third party. The defendant is not itself a party to the contract: this claim only applies to a third party that isn’t involved

Read More Here…

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